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Science. Communication. Community.

Earth Day Round-Up

Did you miss yesterday’s cavalcade of Earth Day coverage because you spent the day soaking up some sun, breaking out your bike, or digging in the dirt? Don’t you worry. We’ve got it covered. Here are a few stories we saw on Earth Day.

by Jessica Morrison

Good news: Our favorite life-sustaining planet received a lot of attention yesterday.  (Image credit:  Nasa Goddard Flight Space Center via Flickr)

Good news: Our favorite life-sustaining planet received a lot of attention yesterday. (Image credit: Nasa Goddard Flight Space Center via Flickr)

This date in science: Why celebrate Earth Day on April 22?

The first Earth Day – April 22, 1970 – marked the beginning of the modern environmental movement. Approximately 20 million Americans, especially on college campuses, participated in a national teach-in on environmental issues and protests against environmental deterioration on the first Earth Day. Since then, Earth Day is always celebrated on April 22. But why April 22?

For Earth Day, photos from space: 1 changed how we look at our planet

Happy Earth Day, Earthlings. For Earth Day 2013, take a moment to appreciate your home for what it is — a blue pinpoint on a vast black canvas.

The world – and MSNBC – go ‘green’ for Earth Day

More than 40 years later, the annual observance is a global event with more than one billion people taking part in a multitude of activities to encourage people to care for the planet.

Earth Day 2013: What’s in danger is Earth Day, not just Earth

Earth Day 2013 poll finds Americans far less eco-conscious than they were in 1971, a year after Earth Day was founded. Only 39 percent now say it’s ‘very important’ to restore the environment.

Earth Day! Astronaut Celebrates Earth from Space

Earth Day is even celebrated in space. Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield sent down some well wishes from the International Space Station today (April 22) in honor of Earth Day.

43 Years Of Earth Day: What’s Changed Since 1970

Now in its 43rd year, Earth Day has become an international day dedicated to promoting environmental awareness and action. Lester Brown, president of the Earth Policy Institute, explains what’s changed, as concern about climate change and green energy have come to the forefront of the movement.

Earth Day Begs the Question about the Future of Energy

Yes, today is the 43rd annual Earth Day recognition worldwide. A number of live and online events are taking place; see a list below for some unusual items. But in 2013, to me, the day raises a central question about how to power the human race without killing the planet in the process.

Happy Earth Day!

Taking care of the only habitable planet we’ve got for the foreseeable future seems like an excellent idea. I’m with The Tick: “You can’t destroy the Earth! That’s where I keep all my stuff!” It’s also where a lot of the cool geology is. I mean, yeah, there’s plenty of that on other worlds, but it’s kinda hard to get to.

Study Charts 2,000 Years of Continental Climate Changes

 A comprehensive new analysis of temperature changes over the continents through 2,000 years has found that a long slide in temperatures in most regions preceded the unusual global warming of recent decades, but with a lot of regional variability and other fascinating details.

Happy Earth Day!

The view from the NASA Terra satellite this afternoon is just stunning. It shows the cold and snow of winter remaining over Canada but look at the advancing bright green spring in Virginia!

Earth Day 2013: Facts, Myths, Pictures, and More

In 1970 smog choked major U.S. cities and toxic waste flooded rivers. That same year nearly 20 million Americans participated in events on April 22, spearheaded by Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson, to draw attention to the environmental issues plaguing the planet and human health. Named Earth Day, April 22 has remained a time to celebrate restoration and stand up for the planet.

Did we miss something good? Share your favorite Earth Day links in the comments!

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This entry was posted on April 23, 2013 by in natural history, space and tagged , .
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